A Gorge-ous Hike

By Mark

While we were at the Homestead Resort, one of the other fun activities we went on was their Cascades Gorge Hike.  There is a unique rain forest area nearby, which the resort also owns.   We were very fortunate, in that it rained all night and only stopped an hour before our group was scheduled to go out, which meant that we had a relatively small group.  Each hike is led by a naturalist and professional cat herder.  We were very fortunate to get Brian La Fountain as our guide and master level bad joke teller.   His puns, Sarah said in amazement are worse than mine.   He has been doing this for 30 years and you can tell totally loves his job.   You can read a bit more about him here; http://bit.ly/1Yxtlhy.

Anyway, the hike goes past 12 beautiful small waterfalls along its three mile path.  Each cascade has a very unique look.  This blog is about how I tried to process the images to capture what I saw there. 

When you go out chasing waterfalls, you have some key choices to make.  Are you trying to capture the energy of the rushing water, or are you trying to show the silkiness of the water that comes with the passage of time?  Normally, I shoot with my camera on Aperture priority.  I like choosing what elements of my image are going to be in the sharpest focus and then letting the camera figure out the right shutter speed to deliver that.   Waterfalls, like sports are best shot in Shutter priority mode.  You decide how much of the activity you want to freeze.   The longer the exposure, the smoother the water appears.  Since we were on a group hike, I didn’t have the luxury to really stay and linger, so I couldn’t do any true “long” exposures.   

I’m going to walk through three representative images from the hike.  I processed each of them slightly differently to try and experiment a bit.  Each image was initially processed in LR, but then sent them all over to Photoshop were I took slightly different approaches towards finishing each one.  

Image 213 Initial

Image 213 Initial

Image 213 wasn’t slow enough to get the really silky water, but also not crisp enough to capture the spray.   After opening the image in Photoshop, I used Nik Perfect Effects and applied the Dynamic contrast filter.  That filter made the image look too “crunchy”, so I reduced the opacity of that layer down to about 75 percent which made it look more natural.  I then returned it to LR and used the brush adjustment tool only on the water.  I applied negative Highlights and fairly strong De-haze and Clarity along the path of the waterfall.  I finished the image by applying a slight edge vignette to help draw the viewer’s eye towards the now visible details.

Image 213 Final

Image 213 Final

For image 218 I went strictly old school Photoshop, using a combination of luminosity masks and targeted adjustment levels.  

Image 218 Initial

Image 218 Initial

Under the Channels palette, I made copies of the blue and Green Channels and then made them into a selection.  

That creates a mask for applying a curves adjustment layer.  For each channel I applied the same method.  First I used the eye droppers on the side of the Curves panel to set the black and white points for the image.  I then dragged the shadows curve downward on the left and slightly raised the highlights into a gentle “S” which increased the contrast on both sides of the scale.

I repeated this for the blue Channel as well.  Finally I added a Vibrance adjustment layer to make the greens “pop” just a bit more. 

Layers Palette

Layers Palette

218 Final Image

218 Final Image

For image 228, I liked the silkiness, but thought the background was pretty blah.  Again I used the Nik Perfect Effects filters starting with the Dynamic Contrast, this time though I added a slight bit of Tonal Contrast as well to brighten and sharpen the overall image.   

228 Initial

228 Initial

You have to be careful, because some of those effects can rapidly take your image to cartoon land.  Because the Nik tools get added as a separate layer in PS, you have the option of using the masking tools on top of the effects.  The Dynamic contrast added too much detail into the water and so this time I used very soft brush set with about 10% flow and slowly painted out about half of the filter’s impact over the water.  Exactly the reverse of what I did on the very first image. 

228 Final

228 Final

The final images show how you can use the tools available to get the image you shot in your mind, and that there is always more than one way to accomplish an effect.   

It’s Alive! It’s Alive!

By Mark

Back in the 28 January blog I was singing the praises of the new features found in the OnOne Perfect Photo Suite 8 while lamenting the lack of updates from NiK software since their purchase by Google.  Well since then there have been two rays of light in the tunnel.  One of Adobe’s Photoshop most engaging engineers/managers decided it was time for a change.   John Nack moved over to Google and is now working on their imagery software. Just two weeks ago, Nik introduced a major update to a previously sort of blah module in the Nik Collection.  The Analog EfexPro2 lets you add a lot of film effects and transforms your images as if they were shot with some very different cameras.  http://jnack.com/blog/2014/05/14/introducing-analog-efex-pro-2-part-of-the-nik-collection/

Like the other members of the Nik collection, you can edit them directly from Lightroom or open the image first in Photoshop.  

The top level menu illustrates the kinds of things you can accomplish. I started out with one of the models from PSW and what is a decent shot.

 The first pull-down menu gives you choices for various types of cameras-ranging from Classic to Toy Cameras, like the LOMO.  

The Wet Plate camera provides some interesting starting points.  Each of the “recipes” allows you full choice to customize via all of the menu alternatives.  You can vary the intensity of each effect.  

The Camera Kit serves as a blank starting point which lets you build up the precise combinations you want.  The Bokeh menu gives you pretty good control of your depth of field.

 I found the frames option fun as it left it looking like an old image from a camera roll.

Some of the features are things we always tried to prevent like “Light Leaks” and “Dirt & Scratches”.   Now I am not a huge fan of Instagram, or at least of a lot of “retro” styles that seem to be popular. 

Kaitlyn--pretty much already retro cool

Kaitlyn--pretty much already retro cool

But you can indeed quickly make your images appear as if you just found that set of prints stuck inside a scratchy envelope in a dusty shoebox left over from the 1950’s. 

All in all, the entire module is interesting and works very quickly. I am not certain that I would use these every day in my work, but some might.  I am just hopeful that this is just the sign of more updates to come.  Silver Efex Pro3 anyone?