Getting Started Editing in LR Mobile

By Mark

Late breaking development (so to speak), Adobe today announced that you can now show RAW HDR from the LR Mobile camera app.  Wait, you didn’t know LR Mobile had a camera app?   Well that will be much farther down the listing of topics, giving all of you something to look forward to.

LR Mobile can edit your pictures in a couple of different ways.  First it can serve as a non-destructive method for editing the images on your camera roll.  Secondly, it can edit the photos from your desktop connection which you have chosen to be synchronized.  It is that second category which is amazing, because LR is really working on the very small smart preview file and not on the larger image, but when it synchronizes, the changes you applied are reflected on your image and in the history for that image.

Let’s start with just a basic example.  I shot this not so great image in a restaurant with my iPhone.  The white balance is really off, as my model was not suffering from jaundice.  Just a quick adjustment and now she looks normal, well as normal as our beloved Kaitlyn can be.

Here is a basic image I shot last fall at the LHS football game.  It was a pretty sunset, but the image didn’t quite capture the full range of color.

One of the first editing tasks is usually just selecting and culling the ones you want to work on.  LR allows you to use the same pick or reject flags and/or rating stars.  You then can then filter them quickly, allowing you to focus on only the images worth your time to edit. 

First let’s talk about the basic editing controls at the bottom of the screen:

Filmstrip-does exactly what you expect and opens up a scrollable filmstrip of whatever group of images you are working on.

Crop- allows you to change the aspect ratio of your image using a set of predefined ratios, or you can grab the edges of your image via the control box, or you can rotate the image via the little wheel underneath your image.

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Presets- opens up a selection of sub menus with common recipes for adjusting an image; Creative, Color, B&W, Detail, Effect, and Camera

Edit- opens the equivalent of the basic develop module panel from your desktop version.  Over on the left side, underneath the aperture icon are the advanced features we’ll talk about next time.

Everything above applies global changes to the whole image.  They have now added a new Selective control, which lets you apply limited adjustments for those basic panels.  You use your fingers like a brush and can apply multiple fixes. 

That’s a lot of material just in the basic features, so go off and play with your images. Remember, you can’t really hurt anything.