Snow Day

By Roger (13 Feb 2014)

Snow is ideal for high contrast photos.

Snow is ideal for high contrast photos.

Well, today was a snow day in northern Virginia. The government is closed, and the doomsdayers are in control of the grocery stores. We got about 12 inches, and the stuff is still falling. I guess I should have bought that snowblower, afterall.

I have a few hours of shoveling to get to, so this one will be real short.

Night time in Old Town Manassas, Va.

Night time in Old Town Manassas, Va.

Three tips we've given in the past to keep in mind:

Your camera's meter will be trying to turn all that bright beautiful snow into an 18% gray. Add 1.5-2 stops of extra exposure compensation to keep it looking pretty.

Don't forget your macro lens when you're out in the snow. (Ft. Wainwright, AK)

Don't forget your macro lens when you're out in the snow. (Ft. Wainwright, AK)

Protect your gear. Even if you have a weather-proofed camera, you should cover your lenses and camera with some kind of protection. The price range for this stuff is wide and worth every penny, no matter what you use. You can use a plastic bag from your pantry or the custom fit Gortex. Don't forget to put your camera in a sealed bag before you leave the cold and re-enter the nice, cozy house. Condensation can cause problems with your camera or grow mold inside your lens, rendering it a total loss.

Snow doesn't have to be your subject when you are in a snow-covered location. (Smithfield, Va)

Snow doesn't have to be your subject when you are in a snow-covered location. (Smithfield, Va)

And, as I said just a couple of weeks ago – you need to get out there. Yes, it's cold and wet (snow always has been), but every place you've shot has changed because of the snowfall. It looks different. It looks “purty.” Go shoot. Have fun.

Try an abstract while you're in the snow.

Try an abstract while you're in the snow.